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Vaccines are Safe and Effective - MD's invited to weigh in here.



The physicians and health care professionals of Sonoma County, agree that vaccines are not only safe and effective, but critical to protecting individuals and our community from serious life-threatening infectious diseases.  When a large majority of the population is vaccinated, the resulting herd immunity prevents the spread of disease and protects those who cannot be vaccinated - infants, children and people with compriomised immune systems.  These groups are especially vulnerable to complications from vaccine preventable diseases.  The best way to protect yourself, your loved ones and your community is to get vaccinated.  

Please use the comments section below to weigh in on this issue. 

Comments (39)

Angela E Zarate, MD Reply

I fully support this statement.

1 hour ago
Marjorie Bohn, DO Reply

I completely support this statement. Vaccines are effective.. We all have the moral responsibility to educate one another about the scientific facts and fallacies to ensure the long term health of our community.

3 hours ago
Crystal Cox PA-C Reply

The science and data are clear. Vaccines save lives. Until there is a legal or financial impact on those who propagate the misinformation, rates of vaccine preventable disease will continue to persist and even increase. As health care professionals, who have promised to be advocates, we must stand unified and unwavering in our efforts to protect the most vulnerable and voiceless population... our children.

4 hours ago
Robert Hickman MD Reply

I support this statement affirming the need for vaccinations as a critical part of health care. I personally seen patients ill with tetanus, measles, and meningitis. These are preventable with universal vaccination.
Robert L Hickman MD.

4 hours ago
Deidre Bass Reply

I support this statement
Deidre Bass DO

5 hours ago
Kevin Hamann, MD Reply

I fully endorse this statement and the efforts of our medical community to promote vaccinating our children.

21 hours ago
J.Richard Mendius,MD Reply

as a neurologist I more than aware of the devastation that can occurs a consequence of easily preventable illnesses such as measles. I find a tragic that the human capacity for self delusion and mythology can lead to such devastating consequences. Avoiding vaccination because of some fear of an unproven association is a dangerous delusion.

21 hours ago
Cheryce Thomas, PA-C Reply

Vaccines are safe, effective, and critical for protecting a community.

21 hours ago
Kathy Hardin, FNP Reply

Kathy Hardin, FNP in support of the above statement

22 hours ago
Shawn Franklin MD Reply

When I worked overseas in places where these diseases still exist, parents wanted their children to be vaccinated.
Be proactive. Vaccines are the best way to protect your loved ones and your community.

1 days ago
Jose Morales, MD Reply

I support immunizations 100%

1 days ago
Veronica Jordan Reply

I support this statement.

1 days ago
Adrienne Silver Reply

I support vaccinations 100%. We live in a community and have a responsibility to protect our most vulnerable.

1 days ago
Ann Marie Martin MD Reply

I support this statement.

1 days ago
Gary Green Reply

As physicians, we are responsible for protecting the most vulnerable and helpless in our society. To some this is a professional responsibility, to others it’s a vocation. Many immune suppressed children and adults are terribly vulnerable to such common diseases like measles. Not vaccinating healthy children with such a safe vaccine, jeopardizes the health of so many. Measles (MMR) vaccine is exponentially safer than letting your child ride a bike or scate board, or play competitive sports. As a parent and physician, I implore us to make wise decisions — declining vaccination in a healthy child is not one of them.

1 days ago
Fred Brewer Reply

When I started my medical career in 1976 we would treat up to 30 kids a year for diseases now prevented by vaccines. Some of those kids died and many were damaged. We never see those kids any more because vaccines work.

1 days ago
Erin Lund Reply

I support this statement.

2 days ago
Dr. Paulomi Shah Reply

I come from a country where vaccines were not available to everyone, and I know friends' parents/grandparents who had paralytic polio. Vaccines save lives, and we have to do everything we can to educate our families. I represent California Children's Services being the Medical Director for the program for Sonoma County. I still practice at the Pediatrics Campus of SRCH. The 1800 children of Sonoma County CCS are at the highest risk from complications if they get sick from a vaccine-preventable illness. As are children under 2 years/old, pregnant women and seniors. We all have a responsibility to protect those that are most vulnerable to complications. We all need to be vaccinated to protect those who cannot protect themselves. Vaccines save lives!

2 days ago
Parker Duncan, MD, MPH Reply

Declining vaccines for your child is strong statement to society that you value your individual beliefs over the safety of not only your children, but also those of the rest of society.
As a former Christian Scientist who became a Family Physician, I am well aware of the religious and cultural struggles over this issue; the irony being that religion is supposed to enforce the value of believing in something larger than oneself.

3 days ago
Kari Foulke MD Reply

Vaccines are important!!



3 days ago
Irene Baluyut, MD Reply

My dad had polio as a child when vaccines were not yet available. He told us how many of the children in their town had the same illness and some died. He survived with weakness and atrophy of his right leg. I had mumps as a child and still remember how miserable I felt. As the vaccines became available, my parents made sure we received them. This was the time when doctors would make house calls ! I remember all five of us children lining up at home to get the vaccines as they became available.
As a medical student, I have seen babies born with cataracts when their mothers were pregnant and had either rubeola or rubella. I have cared of children suffering from tetanus and unfortunately died from respiratory failure. I have seen young children suffer and die of pneumonia from measles. I have seen older children develop general muscle weakness and diagnosing them with SSPE years after the family thought they have cleared their episode of measles.
I remember as a pediatric resident when we would "guess" if the CSF culture grew Haemophilus or pneumococcus from lumbar punctures we did for children who had meningitis. We were able to "smell" rotavirus the minute we step into the exam room in an infant who has severe diarrhea.
I slowly saw these illnesses decrease years later because of the vaccines. It is sad and ironic that our patients have to suffer through these illnesses again because vaccines worked and parents do not know how terrible these illnesses are for their babies and children and opt to ignore the science.

4 days ago
David L Smith Reply

I have been in practice in Santa Rosa since 1977. Vaccines have virtually eliminated many of our most fearsome diseases. Potential vaccines are carefully investigated before release and post-marketing surveillance continues. Most candidate vaccines never come into use. There is compensation available for the rare-truly one in a million- cases where the recipient is injured. California law SB 277 has reduced the number of unimmunized children. Now SB 276 proposes to give public health authorities the tools to investigate fraudulent medical exemption waivers which endanger children who truly cannot receive a few vaccines. There is a local purveyor of such exemptions. Look him up.
The fact that US vaccines cost much more than elsewhere in the world is a separate issue and is not a reason to avoid protecting children and adults.

6 days ago
Rhonda Berney MD Reply

As a child I had serious illnesses now preventable by vaccination and in the earlier part of my career cared for children who suffered devastating complications of vaccine preventable infections despite medical care. I had my beloved children fully vaccinated and continue to recommend that parents do the same.

last week
Sara Martin, MD, MSc Reply

Vaccines are an important contribution to the health of our community.

last week
Sara Martin, MD, MSc Reply

Vaccines are an important contribution to the health of our community.

last week
Sara Martin, MD, MSc Reply

last week
Natalie Snyder, M.D. Reply

All children should have the right to not die from a disease that is vaccine preventable

last week
David Schneider, MD Reply

Vaccines are one of the great successes of Western medicine. They are safe and effective, proven time and time again. I, too, have seen vaccine-preventable diseases, with some very sad results. Protect your child, your family, and your community by vaccinating our children.

last week
Stephen Daniel Cady MD Reply

Smart. Safe. Perfect way to stay healthier.

last week
Stephen Daniel Cady MD Reply

Yep. Safe, smart, and easy. Perfect way to stay safe and healthier.

last week
William Carroll, MD Reply

Vaccines are one of the most important public health gains of the last 100 years, and save countless lives annually. They are safe and effective and the scientific evidence supporting that statement is incontrovertible. You either believe in the scientific method or you do not, but the science proves vaccines save lives.

last week
Louis Menachof M.D. Reply

I practiced in the prevaccine era and saw firsthand the disease and death caused by the diseases now preventable with vaccines. It saddens me to know there are parents who choose to return to those "good old days". They were not "so good".

last week
Leland Davis Reply

This will be my 47th year in practice in Sonoma County. I am probably one of the few physicians still working that has actually cared for patients with measles, congenital rubella syndrome, polio, and bacterial meningitis. The success of the vaccines is in my opinion one of the reasons that people are complacent and refuse to immunize. As evidenced by the resurgence of measles, we can not let our guard down. It is possible to convince some, but not all, vaccine deniers that the vaccines are safe and important and get them to change their mind.

last week
Karen Holbrook, MD, MPH Reply

Karen Holbrook, MD, MPH, in support of the above statement!

last week
Dennis Pocekay Reply

Vaccines are safe and effective!!!

last week
Lori Johnson Reply

Lori Johnson, FNP

last week
Tahereh Naderi Reply

Tahereh Naderi, MD

last week
Roseann Day Reply

Roseann Day, MD in support of the above statement

last week
Brian Prystowsky, M.D. Reply

Please add your name as a comment to show our community that physicians overwhelmingly believe that vaccines are safe and effective. When we have enough names, we'll ask the Press Democrat to publish the above statement with all our names in support as a public statement.

Brian Prystowsky, M.D.

last week






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